Bicycle tuneup – German training

I got thoroughly drenched with the rain on the way back on the bike with some groceries a couple of days ago – tornado like conditions.

Still getting used to the new camera – it has a macro option, and although my Targus card reader had not been working, I opened it up, and was able to get it to work finally, in an open state.  Not sure if it will ever work again closed.  It is nice to be able upload pictures in Lucid pup finally.  I don’t know yet if I can read them directly into linux from the camera – I didn’t bring my cable.  The camera has a macro option, and it also does video.  I don’t know about sound, which will be useful for bird calls.

The orange butterflies have been out for about 1 week now,

and there are some other smaller moths I think, also.

A couple of tarantulas on the road,

and a 4 ft long cotton-mouth water moccasin on the road near the gate.

I tuned up the bike – lubing the chain, and putting some air in the tires.  Riding is easier now.  Spent a little time consoling a man who is having marital problems because he snores.  I encouraged him to set aside his problems today, it being mother’s day, and reinforce the importance of the role his wife plays in the family with their children.  They should see her as important and worthy of being acknowledged.

With a little current news about German trains, and some perspective with a little relaxation, I’ve decided to make the progressive move from French to German to Greek.  That is moving from languages that don’t decline nouns (the Latin ones –  although Latin does decline, its derivative languages- French and Spanish don’t.  and English, although not derived from Latin, does not either) to ones that do (German – a little, Greek – a lot, Hebrew – a lot).  I think that it is important to review what I learn, and I hope that with contact with people from other languages, I will be motivated to work on the spanish, and other languages.  The language move is also from letters that I know well, to letters that are newer for me.  And finally, work in Hebrew, which in addition to new letters, has a change in direction.  One nice thing about German is that it is a very logical language.  So, for people that like to analyze symbolically, it is a good language to learn.  It adds a 3rd gender to nouns in addition to French and Spanish (masculine and feminine, and now there is the neutral). It also retains the 3rd person singular version of formal that Spanish has, as opposed to uniting it with the 2nd person as French does.  Unfortunately, I don’t have a dictionary – and am limited to a few hours of internet access 3 times a week.  So, figuring out the words is not trivial.

Minimally, I probably need some examples:

Taking words with known genders, and finding them in a few different declined cases in sentences.  Then I can make the rules by inference. So, pick some known words like das Kind, der Vater, die Mutter, der Brueder, die Schwester, der Onkel, die Tante, and find them in all possible cases, singular and plural to form the rules – maybe using a site like this one:

http://www.kind-familie.de/

The other way is to go top down and learn the rules.  I kind of remember most of them.

As far as vocab goes, without the dictionary, I’ve opted to look for some bilingual texts and make my own dictionary from these texts.  I should be able to write some code to exercise both vocab and declension in addition to the hyper-tense verb program.  Finding nouns in German sentences is easy – they are all capitalized.

I think with the direction I am going with exploration: I am going to organize the local flora, mushrooms, then pollinators, spiders, birds, snakes, and stars into folders, modify the flowers program and organize information – pursuing first an empirical approach, noticing detail, learning descriptive vocabulary, and finally looking for logic and rules.  Try to develop the vocabulary to describe and organize them locally, and then move to a new location.  This is kind of by analogy with the directions I am pursuing with languages.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s