300 Words for the Queen in Various Languages on the Occasion of her 60th Jubilee

It’s a big empire some of it historical!

Posting the Spanish-English word files, will post others when this one is thoroughly benched.  There are currently 6, but I plan to do Ray Bradbury as well.

This is the multilingual version.  The reference is Spanish.  Right now, all files in another language need to be set up for the program to run, I think.  So, all 6 files need to have correspondants in French, for example.

Code is here:

#!/bin/bash

# write_words_spanish_queensenglish.sh v.1.2 a program submitted by livedoggb on June 8/2012

# dependencies compiled random1.c, and intdiv2float.c and language directories like french-queensenglishtestnouns and/or spanish-queensenglishtestnouns directories

# with noun files called 01 spanish-queensenglish-Dickens-nouns1.txt, 02 spanish-queensenglish-Blake-nouns2.txt and/or 01 french-queensenglish-Dickens-nouns1.txt,

# 02 french-queensenglish-Blake-nouns2.txt in their appropriate directories

# itunes directory named spanish-queensenglish music or french-queensenglish music with songs that you want to use sequentially numbered 01 …, 02 …, 03 … etc.

# itunes directory named spanish-queensenglish highlit or french-queensennglish music with audio tracks of the queensenglish quotes made by you named french-queensenglish-01nouns01.avi, or spanish-queensenglish-01nouns01.avi, spanish-queensenglish-01nouns33.avi, etc.

# with the number corresponding to the line number of the noun in the text file.

# the number of files in each of the language directories must be the same right now. The Spanish one is reference.

# It also outputs a file sommaire.out that has the statistics of your session.

dir_path=”/mnt/sdc1″

function trim_line {

i=1

echo

#num_words=$(gawk ‘{ sum += $1 }; END { print sum }’ testline.out)

words_left=”c”

while [ “$words_left” != “” ]

do

j=$(( $i + 8 ))

words_left=$( echo $line | cut -d’ ‘ -f$i-$j )

echo $words_left

i=$(( $j + 1 ))

done

return

}

 

 

function echo_in_color_noun_w_gender {

color=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^[0-9]*c:\(.*\)ENG: \(.*\) (\(.\)) SENT:.*/\3/” )

case “$color” in

“m”)

echo -e ‘\E[47;34m'”33[1m$noun33[0m”

;;

“f”)

echo -e ‘\E[47;31m'”33[1m$noun33[0m”

;;

“n”)#0CF82B

echo -e ‘\E[47;42m'”33[1m$noun33[0m”

;;

esac

tput sgr0

return

}

function select_language {

lang_picked=”notpicked”

while [ $lang_picked == “notpicked” ]

do

echo “Available languages are:”

echo 1. French

echo 2. German

echo 3. Spanish

echo 4. Italian

echo 5. Portuguese

echo 6. Greek

echo 7. Hebrew

echo 8. Arabic

echo 9. Chinese

echo 10. Russian

echo 11. Polish

echo 12. Norwegiann

echo 13. Dutch

echo 14. Hindi

echo 15. Sanskrit

echo 16. Pharsi

echo

echo -n “Enter a number:”

read lang_num

if [ $lang_num -gt 2 ]

then

echo “Language not yet available. Pick another one. ”

fi

case $lang_num in

1)

language=”french-queensenglish”

lang_picked=”picked”

;;

2)

language=”german-queensenglish”

;;

3)

language=”spanish-queensenglish”

lang_picked=”picked”

;;

4)

language=”italian-queensenglish”

;;

5)

language=”portuguese-queensenglish”

;;

6)

language=”greek-queensenglish”

;;

7)

language=”hebrew-queensenglish”

;;

8)

language=”arabic-queensenglish”

;;

9)

language=”chinese-queensenglish”

;;

esac

done

LANG=es_ES.UTF-8

tvf=$( echo “$language”testnouns)

dir_txt_path=$( echo $dir_path/$tvf/ )

return

}

clear

select_language

if [ -e $dir_path/sommaire.out ]

then

rm $dir_path/sommaire.out

fi

#rm $dir_path/hyper-tense-files_used.out

sum_fautes=0

if [ -e $dir_path ]

then

echo “directory path passed.”

else

echo “directory path not valid. Your USB device might be mounted under a different name. Reset path on line 11 and start over.”

read

fi

echo “Please wait for a few minutes while the system sets up the music database.”

if [ -e $dir_path/$language-time2.out ]

then

echo “The program has found a time file.”

echo “1. Use this file.”

echo “2. Make a new time file. Choose 2 if you have changed the music.”

echo “Please choose: (If you aren´t sure, choose 2. The default is 2.)”

read choice

else

echo “0” > $dir_path/$language-time2.out

choice=2

fi

if [ -e $choice ]

then

choice=2

fi

case $choice in

1)

echo “Using the old file.”

;;

2)

echo “Making another file. This will take a few minutes. Please be patient.”

if [ -e $dir_path/$language-time2.out ]

then

rm $dir_path/$language-time2.out

fi

echo “0” > $dir_path/$language-time2.out

mplayer -msglevel all=-1 -profile gnome-mplayer -ss 10 -endpos 1 -volume 0 /mnt/sda1/Documents\ and\ Settings/TEMP/My\ Documents/My\ Music/iTunes/iTunes\ Media/Music/$language\ music/*.* | tee temp.out | grep “^A: ” | sed -e ‘s/^A: .* of \([0-9]*\).* .*/\1/g’ >> $dir_path/$language-time2.out

;;

esac

time_array=($(cat $dir_path/$language-time2.out))

i=1

num_files=$(expr $(grep -c . $dir_path/$language-time2.out))

i=0

while [ $i -lt $num_files ]

do

echo “$i. ${time_array[$i]}”

i=$(( $i + 1 ))

done

num_files=$(( $num_files – 1 ))

echo “num_files=” $num_files

echo

echo “Several options are possible. Please choose.”

echo “1. Training mode (Find the word).”

echo “2. Quiz mode. (interactive).”

read choice

echo “With oral reading? Choose y or n. Default is n.”

read read_aloud

if [ -e $read_aloud ]

then

read_aloud=”n”

fi

case “$choice” in

1)

echo “Training mode.”

;;

2)

echo “Quiz mode.”

;;

esac

echo “All information derives from .txt files in the folder ” $dir_txt_path

language_primer=$( echo $dir_path/spanish-queensenglishtestnouns )

c=””

right=0

asked=0

rightverbs=””

wrongverbs=””

average=0

verb_guess=””

num_vfiles=$(expr $(ls -1 $dir_txt_path/*.txt | grep -c . ))

hours_bgn=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\1/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

min_bgn=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\2/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

sec_bgn=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\3/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

while [ -e $c ]

do

random_verb_num=$( $dir_path/random1 1 $num_vfiles)

fn=$random_verb_num

echo “random_verb_num is:” $random_verb_num

verb=$(ls $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt | sed “s/^.*$fn \(.*\).txt/\1/” )

if [ -e $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt ]

then

maxlinenum=$( grep -c . $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt)

maxlinenum=$(( $maxlinenum – 1 ))

quizfact=$( $dir_path/random1 1 $maxlinenum)

correctquizfact=$( echo “$quizfact”c)

omit_line=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt)

# echo “random quiz line is:” $quizfact $correctquizfact

if [ “$omit_line” != “” ]

then

noun=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.* ENG: \(.*\) SENT:.*/\1/” )

echo -n “The noun is: ”

echo_in_color_noun_w_gender “random quiz line is:” $quizfact

if [ “$choice” == “2” ]

then

testline=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $language_primer/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.*SENT:\(.*\)SENTCOMP:.*/\1/”)

else

testline=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $language_primer/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.*SENTCOMP:\(.*\)/\1/” )

fi

line=$testline

trim_line

verb_guess=””

asked=$(( $asked + 1 ))

while [ -e $verb_guess ]

do

echo “Enter the correct form of the noun (enter e to exit):”

read verb_guess

done

if [ “$verb_guess” == “e” ]

then

break

fi

echo_verb=$( grep “^$correctquizfact:” $language_primer/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^[0-9]*c: \(.*\) ENG: \(.*\) (.) SENT: .*/\1/” )

if [ “$verb_guess” == “$echo_verb” ]

then

echo “Correct.”

right=$(( $right + 1 ))

average=$(( $right/$asked ))

rightverbs=$( echo $rightverbs, $echo_verb)

num_mus=$( $dir_path/random1 1 $num_files )

num_mus_fixed=$(echo $num_mus | sed -e “s/^0//”)

prob_time=$(( ${time_array[$num_mus_fixed]} – 20 ))

ssx=($(expr $($dir_path/random1 0 $prob_time)))

mplayer -msglevel all=-1 -profile gnome-mplayer -ss $ssx -endpos 20 -volume 200 /mnt/sda1/Documents\ and\ Settings/TEMP/My\ Documents/My\ Music/iTunes/iTunes\ Media/Music/$language\ music/$num_mus*.*

else

echo “No. The correct response is: ” $echo_verb

echo “random quiz line is:” $quizfact

wrongverbs=$( echo $wrongverbs, $echo_verb )

fi

if [ $read_aloud == “y” ]

then

repeat=”y”

if [ -e /mnt/sda1/Documents\ and\ Settings/TEMP/My\ Documents/My\ Music/$language\ highlit/$verb$quizfact.* ]

then

while [ $repeat == “y” ]

do

mplayer -volume 80 /mnt/sda1/Documents\ and\ Settings/TEMP/My\ Documents/My\ Music/$language\ highlit/$verb$quizfact.*

echo “Write the sentences that you heard on paper. Repeat? (y or n. The default is n.)”

read repeat

if [ -e $repeat]

then

repeat=”n”

fi

done

echo

shighlit=$(grep “^$correctquizfact:” $language_primer/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.* SENTCOMP:\(.*\).*/\1/”)

line=$shighlit

trim_line

echo

echo “Count the number of mistakes in what you wrote. One point for every word.”

echo How many errors?

read fault_number

if [ -e $fault_number ]

then

fault_number=0

fi

sum_faults=$(( $sum_faults + $fault_number ))

fi

fi

trans_sent=$(grep “^$correctquizfact:” $dir_txt_path/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.*SENTCOMP:\(.*\)/\1/”)

#

echo

shighlit=$(grep “^$correctquizfact:” $language_primer/$fn*.txt | sed -e “s/^.* SENTCOMP:\(.*\).*/\1/”)

line=$shighlit

trim_line

echo

echo “Please finish by reading the above sentence out loud.”

read

echo “The line number is:” $quizfact

#echo $testline | sed “s/.*(\(.*\)).*/\1/”

#echo $testline | sed “s/(.*)/$echo_verb/”

#echo $trans_sent

echo $echo_verb

aver_right=$( $dir_path/intdiv2float $right $asked | sed -e “s/\([0-9]*\…\).*/\1/” )

echo $right “/” $asked ” correct. Batting average:” $aver_right “Dictation errors: ” $sum_faults

echo “Please wait while I look for another question…”

fi

fi

done

hours_end=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\1/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

min_end=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\2/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

sec_end=$( date| sed “s/.* \(..\):\(..\):\(..\).*/\3/”| sed “s/0\([0-9]\)/\1/” )

hours_diff=$(( $hours_end – $hours_bgn ))

min_diff=$(( $min_end – $min_bgn ))

sec_diff=$(( $sec_end – $sec_bgn ))

midnight=12

if [ $hours_diff -lt 0 ]

then

hours_diff=$(( $(( $midnight – $hours_bgn )) + $hours_end ))

# fix hour change if it happens at midnight or noon,

fi

time_of_ans=$(( $hours_diff * 60 + $min_diff ))

aver_time=$( $dir_path/intdiv2float $time_of_ans $((asked – 1)) | sed -e “s/\([0-9]*\…\).*/\1/” )

echo “You worked ” $time_of_ans “minutes for an average of: ” $aver_time “minutes per question, and a sum of ” $(($asked – 1)) “questions.” | tee >>sommaire.out

echo “The correct nouns (” $right “):” $rightverbs | tee >>sommaire.out

wrong=$(( $asked – $right – 1 ))

echo “The incorrect nouns (” $wrong “):” $wrongverbs | tee >>sommaire.out

num_entries=$(grep “^[0-9]*c:” $dir_txt_path/*.txt | grep -c .)

echo “The database had ” $num_entries “entries.” | tee >>sommaire.out

echo “Your percentage: ” $aver_right | tee >>sommaire.out

cat sommaire.out

————————————————————————————————–

nouns
01c: of bread  ENG: de pan (m) SENT: With the slice ____  _____ in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
02c: his hand  ENG: su mano (f) SENT: With the slice of bread in ___ _____, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
03c: the cap  ENG: el gorro (m) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and ____ little brown-cloth parish ______ on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
04c: his head  ENG: su cabeza (f) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on ___  ________, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
05c: the home  ENG: el hogar (m) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from _____ wretched ________ where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
06c: one word  ENG: una palabra (f) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where _____ kind _______ or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
07c: one look  ENG: una mirada (f) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where _____ kind word or ________ had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
08c: years  ENG: años (m) SENT: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant _______. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: With the slice of bread in his hand, and the little brown-cloth parish cap on his head, Oliver was then led away by Mr. Bumble from the wretched home where one kind word or look had never lighted the gloom of his infant years. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
09c: his feet  ENG: sus pies (m) SENT: At ____  _____, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
10c: a dog  ENG: un perro (m) SENT: At his feet, sat ___ white-coated, red-eyed ______ who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
11c: with eyes  ENG: con ojos (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master ______ both _____ at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
12c: the time  ENG: el tiempo (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at ____ same _______; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
13c: a cut  ENG: una herida (f) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking ___ large, fresh _________ on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
14c: one side  ENG: uno lado (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on _____ ________ of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
15c: his mouth  ENG: su boca (f) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of ____ ________, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
16c: the result  ENG: el resultado (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be _____ _______ of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
17c: some conflict  ENG: unos conflicto (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of _____ recent _______. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
18c: his master  ENG: su amo (m) SENT: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at ____  ________ with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: At his feet, sat a white-coated, red-eyed dog who occupied himself, alternately, in winking at his master with both eyes at the same time; and in licking a large, fresh cut on one side of his mouth, which appeared to be the result of some recent conflict. (Oliver Twist, p. 17, Charles Dickens)
19c: a window  ENG: una ventana (f) SENT: There was ___  ________ on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens)
20c: the entrance  ENG: la entrada (f) SENT: There was a window on each side of ____ dilapidated _______; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens)
21c: one story  ENG: uno piso (m) SENT: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and ____  _______ above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens)
22c: no light  ENG: no luz (f) SENT: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but ____  _____ was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: There was a window on each side of the dilapidated entrance; and one story above, but no light was visible. (Oliver Twist, p. 299, Charles Dickens)
23c: this girl  ENG: esta chica (f) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing _______ poor _______ entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
24c: the question  ENG: la pregunta (f) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of ____  ______, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
25c: her security  ENG: su seguridad (f) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising ____  ______, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
26c: these scoundrels  ENG: estos canallas (m) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring _____ _________  to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
27c: to justice  ENG: a la justicia (f) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels ____  _______ without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
28c: what good  ENG: qué bien (m) SENT: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, _____  _____ should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: “You see,” pursued Mr. Brownlow; “placing this poor girl entirely out of the question, and supposing it were possible to bring these scoundrels to justice without compromising her safety, what good should we bring about? (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
29c: The shouts  ENG: Los gritos (m) SENT: ___ _______ grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
30c: voices  ENG: voces (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new ________ swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
31c: the roar  ENG: el rugido (m) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled ____  ______, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
32c: Fire  ENG: Incendio (m) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of _____! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
33c: the ringing  ENG: la toque (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with ____  _______ of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
34c: an alarm  ENG: una alarma (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of ___ ______-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
35c: the fall  ENG: la caída (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, ____  _____ of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
36c: bodies  ENG: cuerpos (m) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy _______, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
37c: flames  ENG: llamas (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of _______ as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
38c: some obstacle  ENG: unos obstáculo (m) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round _______ new ________, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
39c: food  ENG: comida (f) SENT: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by _______. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: The shouts grew louder as new voices swelled the roar, and he could hear the cry of Fire! mingled with the ringing of an alarm-bell, the fall of heavy bodies, and the crackling of flames as they twined round some new obstacle, and shot aloft as though refreshed by food. (Oliver Twist, p. 598, Charles Dickens)
40c: the garden  ENG: el jardin (m) SENT: Toby and me were over _____  _______-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens)
41c: the wall  ENG: la tapia (f) SENT: Toby and me were over _____ garden-_______ the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens)
42c: the night  ENG: la noche (f) SENT: Toby and me were over the garden-wall _____ _______ afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens)
43c: the panels  ENG: los panelos (m) SENT: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding _____  _______ of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens)
44c: the shutters  ENG: las contraventanas (f) SENT: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of ______ door and _________. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: Toby and me were over the garden-wall the night afore last, sounding the panels of the door and shutters. (Oliver Twist, p. 265, Charles Dickens)
45c: something  ENG: algo (m) SENT: As it was _________ to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)
46c: assistance  ENG: ayuda (f) SENT: As it was something to feel certain that _________ was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)
47c: no time  ENG: no tiempo (m) SENT: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that ___  _____ had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)
48c: the yard  ENG: el jardin (m) SENT: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up ___ inn-_____, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)
49c: a heart  ENG: un corazón (m) SENT: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with ____ somewhat lighter _______. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)
50c: the inn  ENG: la posada (f) SENT: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up _____ _____-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens) SENTCOMP: As it was something to feel certain that assistance was sent for, and that no time had been lost, Oliver hurried up the inn-yard, with a somewhat lighter heart. (Oliver Twist, p. 465, Charles Dickens)

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nouns
01c: my daughter  ENG: mi hija (f) SENT: That is, not bestow ____ youngest __________ Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare)
02c: a husband  ENG: un marido (m) SENT: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have ___  ______ for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare)
03c: the elder  ENG: la mayor (f) SENT: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for _____ _________: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare)
04c: your pleasure  ENG: tu gusto (m) SENT: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at _______ ___________. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: That is, not bestow my youngest daughter Before I have a husband for the elder: If either of you both love Katharina, Because I know you well and love you well, Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure. (The Taming of the Shrew p. 12, Shakespeare)
05c: silence  ENG: silencio (m) SENT: But in other’s __________ do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare)
06c: other  ENG: otro (m) SENT: But in ________’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare)
07c: behavior  ENG: comportamiento (m) SENT: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild __________ and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare)
08: sobriety  ENG: la sobriedad (f) SENT: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and ________. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare)
09c: Peace  ENG: Paz (f) SENT: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. _______, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But in other’s silence do I see Maid’s mild behavior and sobriety. Peace, Tranio! (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 13, Shakespeare)
10c: your father  ENG: tu padre (m) SENT: Here comes _______  ________: never make denial; I must and will have Katharina to my wife. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Here comes your father: never make denial; I must and will have Katharina to my wife. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare)
11c: denial  ENG: negativa (f) SENT: Here comes your father: never make ________; I must and will have Katharina to my wife. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Here comes your father: never make denial; I must and will have Katharina to my wife. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare)
12c: my wife  ENG: mi mujer (f) SENT: Here comes your father: never make denial; I must and will have Katharina to _____ ______. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Here comes your father: never make denial; I must and will have Katharina to my wife. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 33, Shakespeare)
13c: apparel  ENG: indumentaria (f) SENT: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy _______ ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare)
14c: the wedding  ENG: la boda (f) SENT: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst ____  _____-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare)
15c: the day  ENG: el día (m) SENT: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst ____ wedding-______. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare)
16c: the feast  ENG: el banquete (m) SENT: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide _____  ______, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare)
17c: the guests  ENG: los invitados (m) SENT: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid _____ _______; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Give me thy hand, Kate: I will unto Venice, To buy apparel ‘gainst the wedding-day. Provide the feast, father, and bid the guests; I will be sure my Katharina shall be fine. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 34, Shakespeare)
18c: my choice  ENG: mi elección (f) SENT: To strive for that which resteth in ____  _______: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare)
19c: scholar  ENG: erudito (m) SENT: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching ________ in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare)
20c: the schools  ENG: las escuelas (f) SENT: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in ____  ________; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare)
21c: hours  ENG: horas (f) SENT: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to _______ nor’pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare)
22c: my lessons  ENG: mi lecciónes (f) SENT: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor’pointed times, But learn ____  ________ as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To strive for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholar in the schools; I’ll not be tied to hours nor pointed times, But learn my lessons as I please myself. (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 37, Shakespeare)
23c: news  ENG: noticias (f) SENT: Why, is it not _________ to hear of Petruchio’s coming? (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 40, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio’s coming? (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 40, Shakespeare)
24c: coming  ENG: la venida (f) SENT: Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio’s _________? (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 40, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: Why, is it not news to hear of Petruchio’s coming? (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 40, Shakespeare)
25c: His name  ENG: Su nombre (m) SENT: ____  _______ and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare)
26c: His credit  ENG: Su crédito (m) SENT: ____ name and ________ shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare)
27c: your business  ENG: tus negocios (m) SENT: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done _____  ________ in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare)
28c: the city  ENG: la ciudad (f) SENT: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in ______  _______: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: His name and credit shall you undertake, And in my house you shall be friendly lodged: Look that you take upon you as you should; You understand me, sir: so shall you stay Till you have done your business in the city: (The Taming of The Shrew, p. 54, Shakespeare)
29c: his age  ENG: su edad (m) SENT: To give thee all, and in ____ waning _____ Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
30c: foot  ENG: un pie (m) SENT: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set _______ under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
31c: table  ENG: mesa (f) SENT: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy ______: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
32c: a toy  ENG: un juguete (m) SENT: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, ___  _____!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
33c: An fox  ENG: Un zorro (m) SENT: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  ____ old Italian ______ is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
34c: my boy  ENG: mi chico (m) SENT: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, ___  _____.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: To give thee all, and in his waning age Set foot under thy table: tut, a toy!  An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
35c: his mind  ENG: su mente (f) SENT: Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what ____  ______ is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP:  Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare)
36c: gold  ENG: oro (m) SENT: Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him ______ enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP:  Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare)
37c: a puppet  ENG: un titere (m) SENT: Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to ___ _______ or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP:  Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare)
38c: a tooth  ENG: un diente (m) SENT: Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er ___  _______ in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP:  Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare)
39c: many diseases  ENG: muchos enfermedades (f) SENT: Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as _______  ________ as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP:  Nay, look you, sir, he tels you flatly what his mind is: Why give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby; or an old trot with ne’er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two and fifty horses: why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.  (The Taming of the Shrew p. 19, Shakespeare)
40c: The patroness  ENG: La patrocinadora (m) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is _____  __________ of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
41c: harmony  ENG: la armonia (f) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly ___________: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
42c: leave  ENG: permiso (m) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me _______ to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
43c: prerogative  ENG: prerrogativa (f) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have ___________; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
44c: music  ENG: música (f) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in ________ we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
45c: Your lecture  ENG: Tu conferencia (f) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, _______  _________ shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
46c: leisure  ENG: ocio (m) SENT: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have ___________ for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: But, wrangling pedant, this is The patroness of heavenly harmony: Then give me leave to have prerogative; And when in music we have spent an hour, Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.  (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 36, Shakespeare)
47c: the meat  ENG: la carne (f) SENT: As with ______  ______, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
48c: some fault  ENG: algún defecto (m) SENT: As with the meat, _____ undeserved ________ I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
49c: the making  ENG: la fabricación (f) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about ____  ______ of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
50c: the pillow  ENG: la almohada (f) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling ___ _______, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
51c: the bolster  ENG: el cabezal (m) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there ____  _______, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
52c: the way  ENG: la via (f) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, ____  _____ the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
53: the coverlet  ENG: ? (f) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way ____  _________, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)
54c: the sheets  ENG: las sábanas (f) SENT: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way ____  _______… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare) SENTCOMP: As with the meat, some undeserved fault I’ll find about the making of the bed; And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster, This way the coverlet, another way the sheets… (The Taming of the Shrew, p. 51, Shakespeare)

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nouns
01c: the capacity  ENG: la capacidad (f) SENT: Although I possessed _____  ________ of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
02c: animation  ENG: animación (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing ___________, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
03c: a frame  ENG: un armazón (m) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare ___  ______ for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
04c: the reception  ENG: el recibimiento (m) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for ____  ___________ of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
05: its intricacies  ENG: sus ? (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all ____  __________ of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
06c: fibres  ENG: fibra (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of ________, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
07c: muscles  ENG: músculos (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, ________, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
08c: veins  ENG: venas (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and ________, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
09c: a work  ENG: una obra (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained ___  ______ of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
10c: difficulty  ENG: dificultad (f) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable __________ and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
11c: labour  ENG: trabajo (m) SENT: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and __________. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley) SENTCOMP: Although I possessed the capacity of bestowing animation, yet to prepare a frame for the reception of it, with all its intricacies of fibres, muscles, and veins, still remained a work of inconceivable difficulty and labour. (Frankenstein, p. 39, Mary Shelley)
12c: My food  ENG: mi comida (f) SENT: ____  _____ is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
13c: of man  ENG: del hombre (m) SENT: My food is not that ____ _______; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
14c: the lamb  ENG: el cordero (m) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy ____ _____ and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
15c: the kid  ENG: el cabrito (m) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and ____  ______ to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
16c: my appetite  ENG: mi apetito (m) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut ____  ________; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
17: acorns  ENG: ? (m) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; __________ and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
18c: berries  ENG: baya (f) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and _______ afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
19c: nourishment  ENG: alimentación (f) SENT: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient _____________. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. (Frankenstein p. 134, Mary Shelley).
20: the habitations  ENG: ? (m) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from _____ __________ of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
21c: those wilds  ENG: estos estados salvajes SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in _______ _______ where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
22c: the beasts  ENG: las bestias (f) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where ____ _______ of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
23c: of the field  ENG: del campo (m) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts ____ ____ ________ will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
24c: your companions  ENG: tus compañeros (m) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be ______ only ___________.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
25c: the love  ENG: el amor (m) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for ____  ______ and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
26c: the sympathy  ENG: la compación (f) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for _____ love and ________ of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
27c: this exile  ENG: esto exilio (m) SENT: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in ______ ______? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You propose,” replied I, “to fly from the habitations of man, to dwell in those wilds where the beasts of the field will be your only companions.  How can you, who long for the love and sympathy of man, persevere in this exile? (Frankenstein p. 135, Mary Shelley).
28c: several years  ENG: varios años (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent _____  ________ of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
29c: your life  ENG: tu vida (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of _____ _______ at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
30c: my friend  ENG: mi amigo (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, ______ ________, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
31c: last autumn  ENG: el último otoño (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you _____ _______ so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
32c: to solitude  ENG: la soledad (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to __________, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
33c: the society  ENG: la sociedad (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from _____  ________ of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
34c: every creature  ENG: cada criatura (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of _______ _______, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
35c: our connection  ENG: nuestra relación (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret _____ __________, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
36c: honour  ENG: el honor (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in ________ to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
37c: the wishes  ENG: los deseos (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil ______ _______ of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
38c: your parents  ENG: tus padres (m) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of ________ _________ although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
39c: your inclinations  ENG: tus inclinaciónes (f) SENT: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to _______ __________. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP: “You have travelled; you have spent several years of your life at Ingolstadt; and I confess to you, my friend, that when I saw you last autumn so unhappy, flying to solitude, from the society of every creature, I could not help supposing that you might regret our connection, and believe yourself bound in honour to fulfil the wishes of your parents although they opposed themselves to your inclinations. (Frankenstein p. 175, Mary Shelley).
40c: One day  ENG: Un día (m) SENT:  ____  _____, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
41c: a chair  ENG: una silla (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in _____  _______, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
42c: my cheeks  ENG: mis mejillas (m) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and ______  ______ livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
43c: death  ENG: muerte (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in ________.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
44c: gloom  ENG: melancolía (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by _________ and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
45c: misery  ENG: triteza (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and _________, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
46c: a world  ENG: un mundo (m) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in ___ _______ which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
47c: wretchedness  ENG: desgracia (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with _______________.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
48c: one time  ENG: un tiempo (m) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At _____  ________, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
49c: the penalty  ENG: la peña (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer ____  ______ of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
50c: the law  ENG: la ley (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of _____  _______, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
51c: my thoughts  ENG: mis piensamentos (m) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were ____  __________ when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
52c: the door  ENG: la puerta (f) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when ____  ________ of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).
53c: the apartment  ENG: el piso (m) SENT:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of ____  _________ was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley). SENTCOMP:  One day, while I was gradually recovering, I was seated in a chair, my eyes half open, and my cheeks livid like those in death.  I was overcome by gloom and misery, and often reflected I had better seek death than desire to remain in a world which to me was replete with wretchedness.  At one time, I considered whether I should not declare myself guilty, and suffer the penalty of the law, less innocent than poor Justine had been.  Such were my thoughts when the door of my apartment was opened and Mr. Kirwin entered.  (Frankenstein p. 166, Mary Shelley).

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nouns
01c: the valleys  ENG: los valles (m) SENT: Piping down _____  _______ wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
02c: songs  ENG: canciónes (f) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping _______ of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
03c: glee  ENG: gozo (m) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant _______, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
04c: a cloud  ENG: una nube (f) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On ___  ________ I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
05c: a child  ENG: un niño (m) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw ___ ________, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
06c: a Lamb  ENG: un Cordero (m) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about __  ______!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
07c: with cheer  ENG: con viva (m) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped ______ merry _______.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
08c: thy pipe  ENG: tu gaita (m) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop ____ ______, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
09c: the same  ENG: la misma (f) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang ____ _______ again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
10c: with joy  ENG: con alegría (f) SENT: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang ____ _______ again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake) SENTCOMP: Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: “Pipe a song about a Lamb!” So I piped with merry cheer.  “Piper, pipe that song again:”  So I piped: he wept to hear.  “Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer:!” So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. (Songs of Innocence p. 5, William Blake)
11c: the Shepherd  ENG: el Pastor (m) SENT: How sweet is _____  _______’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
12c: the lot  ENG: la parcela (f) SENT: How sweet is _____ Shepherd’s sweet _____! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
13c: the morn  ENG: la manana (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From ____ _______ to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
14c: the evening  ENG: la tarde (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to ____  _______ he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
15c: his sheep  ENG: su oveja (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow ______  ________ all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
16c: the day  ENG: la día (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all _____ _______, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
17c: his tongue  ENG: su lengua (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And ____ ________ shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
18c: with praise  ENG: con alabanza (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled _____ _______.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
19c: the call  ENG: la llamada (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears ____ lambs’ innocent _____, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
20: the ewe  ENG: la oveja (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears ____ ________’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
21c: the reply  ENG: la repuesta (f) SENT: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears ____ ewes’ tender ______; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake) SENTCOMP: How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot! From the morn to the evening he stays; He shall follow his sheep all the day, And his tongue shall be filled with praise.  For he hears the lambs’ innocent call, And he hears the ewes’ tender reply; He is watching while they are in peace, For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.  (Songs of Innocence p. 6, William Blake)
22c: The sun  ENG: El sol (m) SENT: ____  ______ does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
23c: the skies  ENG: los cielos (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy ____ ______; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
24c: The bells  ENG: Las campanas (f) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; _____ merry _______ ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
25c: the Spring  ENG: la Primavera (f) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome _____ _______; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
26: the skylark  ENG: el ? (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; ____ _______ and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
27c: the thrush  ENG: el tordo (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; _____ skylark and _______, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
28c: the birds  ENG: los pájaros (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, _____ ______ of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
29c: the bush  ENG: el arbusto (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of _____ _______, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
30c: the sound  ENG: el sonido (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To ____ bells’ cheerful ________; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
31c: our sports  ENG: nuestros deportes (m) SENT: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sinng louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While _____ _________ shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake) SENTCOMP: The sun does arise, And make happy the skies; The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring; The skylark and thrush, The birds of the bush, Sing louder around To the bells’ cheerful sound; While our sports shall be seen On the echoing Green.  (Songs of Innocence p. 7, William Blake)
32c: an angel  ENG: un angel (m) SENT: And by came ____ _______, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then down a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake) SENTCOMP: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then downn a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake)
33c: a key  ENG: una llave (f) SENT: And by came an angel, who had ___ bright _____, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then down a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake) SENTCOMP: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then downn a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake)
34c: the coffins  ENG: los ataúdes (m) SENT: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened ____  _______, and let them all free; Then down a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake) SENTCOMP: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then downn a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake)
35c: a plain  ENG: una llanura (f) SENT: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then down ___ green _______, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake) SENTCOMP: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then downn a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake)
36c: a river  ENG: un rio (m) SENT: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then down a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in ___  ______, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake) SENTCOMP: And by came an angel, who had a bright key, And he opened the coffins, and let them all free; Then downn a green plain, leaping, they run, And wash in a river, and shine in the sun. (Songs of Innocence p. 11, William Blake)
37c: the woods  ENG: los bosques (m) SENT: When ____ green _______ laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
38c: the voice  ENG: la voz (f) SENT: When the green woods laugh with ____ ______ of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
39c: the stream  ENG: el arroyo (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And ____ dimpling _________ runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
40c: the air  ENG: el aire (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When ____ _______ does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
41c: our wit  ENG: nuestra inteligencia (f) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with _____ merry ______, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
42c: the hill  ENG: la colina (f) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And _____ green _____ laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
43c: the noise  ENG: el ruido (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with _____ ______ of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
44c: the meadows  ENG: los prados (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when ____ _______ laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
45c: the grasshopper  ENG: el saltamontes (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And _____ ___________ laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
46c: the scene  ENG: el escenario (m) SENT: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in ____ merry _________ … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake) SENTCOMP: When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy, And the dimpling stream runs laughing by; When the air does laugh with our merry wit, And the green hill laughs with the noise of it; when the meadows laugh with lively green, And the grasshopper laughs in the merry scene … (Songs of Innocence p. 14, William Blake)
47c: Mercy  ENG: la Misericordia (f) SENT: For ________ has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)
48c: a heart  ENG: un corazón (m) SENT: For Mercy has ___ human ______ Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)
49c: Pity  ENG: Piedad (f) SENT: For Mercy has a human heart _______, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)
50c: a face  ENG: una cara (f) SENT: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, __ human ______; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)
51c: the form  ENG: la forma (f) SENT: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, ____ human ________ divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)
52c: the dress  ENG: el vestido (m) SENT: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, ______ human _______.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake) SENTCOMP: For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)For Mercy has a human heart Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine; And Peace, the human dress.  (Songs of Innocence p. 16, William Blake)

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nouns
01c: walks  ENG: caminatas (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long _______, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
02c: afternoons  ENG: tarde (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly ___________: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
03c: the coming  ENG: la venida (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was _____  _______ home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
04c: twilight  ENG: el crepúsculo (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in _______ raw ________, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
05c: with fingers  ENG: con dedos de la mano (m) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, _______ nipped ______ and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
06c: with toes  ENG: con dedos del pie (m) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, _______ nipped fingers and _______, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
07: chidings  ENG: ? (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by _____  _______ of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
08c: the nurse  ENG: la enfermera (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, ____  ________, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
09c: the consciousness  ENG: la consciencia (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by ____  __________ of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
10c: my inferiority  ENG: mi inferioridad (f) SENT: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of ______ physical ____________ to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. (Jane Eyre, p. 2, Charlotte Brontë)
11c: a bed  ENG: una cama (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of ____ large ______, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
12c: its curtains  ENG: sus cortinas (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with _____ drawn ________ concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
13c: a portion  ENG: una parte (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed ___ considerable _______ of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
14c: the chamber  ENG: la cámera (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of ____ _________.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
15c: An easy-chair  ENG: Un butacón (m) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  ____ ________ was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
16c: the bed-head  ENG: la ? (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near _____ _________: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
17c: a man  ENG:  un hombre (m) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: ____ ______ sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
18c: with the exception of  ENG: a excepción de (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed _____ _______ ________ ____ his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
19c: his coat  ENG: su abrigo (m) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of ____ _______; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
20c: the candle  ENG: la vela (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held _____ _________ over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
21c: the stranger  ENG: el desconocido (m) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- _____ __________, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
22c: his linen  ENG: su ropa blanca (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that _____  ______ on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
23c: one arm  ENG: uno brazo (m) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and ____ _____, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
24c: blood  ENG: sangre (f) SENT: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in ________.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: ‘Here, Jane!’ he said; and I walked round to the other side of a large bed, which with its drawn curtains concealed a considerable portion of the chamber.  An easy-chair was near the bed-head: a man sat in it, dressed with the exception of his coat; he was still; his head leant back; his eyes were closed.  Mr. Rochester held the candle over him; I recognized in his pale and seemingly lifeless face- the stranger, Mason: I saw too that his linen on one side, and one arm, was almost soaked in blood.  (Jane Eyre, p. 204, Charlotte Brontë)
25c: my shoulder  ENG: mi hombro (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
26c: with some stress  ENG: con alguna tensión (f) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
27c: his horse  ENG: su caballo (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to _____  _________.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
28c: the bridle  ENG: ? (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught _____  _______, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
29c: his saddle  ENG: su silla (f) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to ______  _________; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
30c: the effort  ENG: un efuerzo (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made _______ _________, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
31c: his sprain  ENG: su esguince (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched _______  ________.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
32c: his lip  ENG: su labio (m) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing ____ under ______ from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
33c: a bite  ENG: una mordedura (f) SENT: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from ____ hard _______, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse.  Having once caught the bridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacing grimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.  “Now”, said he, releasing his under lip from a hard bite, ” … (Jane Eyre, p. 109, Charlotte Brontë)
34c: The want  ENG: La falta (f) SENT: “______  ______ of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
35c: house  ENG: casa (f) SENT: “The want of ________ or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
36c: or brass  ENG: o lana (f) SENT: “The want of house ____  ________ (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
37c: money  ENG: dinero (m) SENT: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean _______) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
38c: a beggar  ENG: un mendigo (m) SENT: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make ____  ________ in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
39c: your sense  ENG: tu sentido (m) SENT: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in ______  ________ of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word.” (Jane Eyre p. 336, Charlotte Brontë)
40c: the interior  ENG: el interior (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through ____ devastated ___________, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
41c: evidence  ENG: evidencia (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered _________ that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
42c: the calamity  ENG: la calamidad (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that _____  _________ was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
43c: occurrence  ENG: suceso (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late ___________.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
44c: Winter  ENG: Invierno (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  __________ snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
45c: snows  ENG: nieves (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter ______, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
46c: that arch  ENG: esa arca (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through _____ void ________, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
47c: rains  ENG: lluvias (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter _______ beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
48: casements  ENG: ? (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at _______ hollow _________; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
49c: the piles  ENG: los montónes (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst ____ drenched ________ of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
50c: rubbish  ENG: basura (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of ___________, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
51c: vegetation  ENG: vegetación (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished ____________: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
52c: grass  ENG: hierba (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: ________ and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
53c: weed  ENG: mala hierba (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and _________ grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
54c: the stones  ENG: las piedras (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between _____  ________ and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
55: the rafters  ENG: ? (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between _____ stones and fallen _________.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
56c: the owner  ENG: el propríetario (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was _____ hapless __________ of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
57c: this wreck  ENG: esta ruina (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of _______ ____________?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
58c: what land  ENG: que pais (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In _____  ________? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
59: what auspices  ENG: ? (f)SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under _______  ___________? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
60c: the church  ENG: l’iglesia (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to ______ grey _______ tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
61c: the tower  ENG: la torre (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to ______ grey church ________ near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?” (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
62c: the gates  ENG: las puertas (f) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing _____  ________ of his narrow marble house?”  (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?”  (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
63c: the shelter  ENG: el abrigo (m) SENT: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing _____  ________ of his narrow marble house?”  (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë) SENTCOMP: “In wandering round the shattered walls and through the devastated interior, I gathered evidence that the calamity was not of late occurrence.  Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones annd fallen rafters.  And oh! where meantime was the hapless owner of this wreck?  In what land? Under what auspices? My eye involuntarily wandered to the grey church tower near the gates, and I asked, “Is he with Damer de Rochester, sharing the shelter of his narrow marble house?”  (Jane Eyre, p. 420, Charlotte Brontë)
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nouns
01c: indignation  ENG: indignación (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent ____________ at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
02: a mode  ENG: ? (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such ____  ______ of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
03: the exclusion ENG: la exclusión (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to _____  __________ of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
04c: all conversation  ENG: toda conversación (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of _______ ___________, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
05c: his neighbour  ENG: su vecino (m) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was _____  __________, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
06c: a amusement  ENG: una diversión (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What ___ charming __________ for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
07c: for people  ENG: para gente (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement ____ young _________ this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
08c: nothing  ENG: nada (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is ________ like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
09c: like dancing  ENG: como baile (m) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like ___________ after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
10c: the refinements  ENG: el refinamiento (m) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of  first __________ of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
11c: the advantage  ENG: la ventaja (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has _____ __________ also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
12c: in vogue  ENG: de moda (f) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being ____  _______ amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
13c: Every savage  ENG: Cada salvaje (m) SENT: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  ______  ________ can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much ENG:rossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbor, till Sir William thus began:  “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all, I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society.”  “Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.  Every savage can dance.”  (Pride and Prejudice p. 16, Jane Austen)
14c: the contemplation  ENG: la contemplación (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to ____ silent ____________ of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
15: the vestibule  ENG: ? (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about ____ ____ __________ to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
16c: the end  ENG: el fin (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for ____ _____ of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
17c: the conference  ENG: la conferencia (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of _____  ____________, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
18c: with step  ENG: con paso (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and ______ quick ________ pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
19c: the staircase  ENG: la escalera (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her ______  ____ __________, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
20c: the breakfast  ENG: el desayuno (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered _____ ________-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
21c: the room  ENG: el cuarto (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered ______ breakfast-________, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
22c: terms  ENG: condiciones (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm ______ on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
23c: the prospect  ENG: la perspectiva (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on ____ happy ________ of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
24: these felicitations  ENG: ?(m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned ________ ____________ with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
25c: with pleasure  ENG: con gusto (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations ________ equal ___________, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
26c: the particulars  ENG: los pormenores (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate ____  _________ of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
27c: their interview  ENG: su entrevista (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of ______ ___________, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
28c: every reason  ENG: todo motivo (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had _______ __________ to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
29c: the refusal  ENG: la negativa (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since _____ __________ which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
30c: his cousin  ENG: su prima (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which ______ _________ had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
31: her modesty  ENG: su púdico (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from _______ bashful _________ and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
32c: the delicacy  ENG: la delicadeza (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and ______ genuine __________ of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
33c: her character  ENG: su carácter (m) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of ______ ___________.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
34c: This information  ENG: Esta información (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  _______  __________, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
35c: his proposals  ENG: sus propuestas (f) SENT: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against ____ _________, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: Mr. Collins was not left long to the silent contemplation of his successful love; for Mrs. Bennet, having dawdled about in the vestibule to watch for the end of the conference, no sooner saw Elizabeth open the door and with quick step pass her towards the staircase, than she entered the breakfast-room, and congratulated both him and herself in warm terms on the happy prospect of their nearer connection.  Mr. Collins received and returned these felicitations with equal pleasure, and then proceeded to relate the particulars of their interview, with the result of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the refusal which his cousin had steadfastly given him would naturally flow from her bashful modesty and the genuine delicacy of her character.  This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 67, Jane Austen)
36c: His object  ENG: Su objeto (m) SENT: ______ principal _______ must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
37c: the number  ENG: el numéro (m) SENT: His principal object must be to discover ____  ______ of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
38c: a fare  ENG: una tarifa (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with __  ______ from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
39c: the circumstance  ENG: la circunstancia (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that ____  __________ of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
40c: a gentleman  ENG: un caballero (m) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of ___  __________ and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
41c: a lady  ENG: una señora (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of ___ gentleman and _____’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
42c: a removing  ENG: una eliminación (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of ___ gentleman and lady’s _________ from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
43c: one carriage  ENG: uno carruaje (m) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from _____ _________ into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
44c: inquiries  ENG: preguntas (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make _________ at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
45c: the stand  ENG: la plataforma (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out _____  _______ and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
46c: any designs  ENG: algunas intenciónes (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of ____ other ________ that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
47c: a hurry  ENG: prisa (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he ____ such ___  ______ to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
48c: his spirits  ENG: su humor (m) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and ____  _________ so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
49c: difficulty  ENG: la dificultad (f) SENT: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had __________ in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.  It had come with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a gentleman and lady’s removing from one carriage into another might be remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.  If he could anyhow discover at what house the coachman had before sat down his fare, he determined to make inquiries there and hoped it might not be impossible to find out the stand and number of the coach.  I do not know of any other designs that he had formed: but he was in such a hurry to be gone, and his spirits so greatly discomposed, that I had difficulty in finding out even so much as this.  (Pride and Prejudice p. 168, Jane Austen)
50c: the hedges  ENG: los setos (m) SENT: How full ____  ______ are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
51c: roses  ENG: las rosas (f) SENT: How full the hedges are of ________! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
52: a briar  ENG: ? (f) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed ___ tall ______, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
53c: branches  ENG: ramas (f) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery _______ across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
54c: the path  ENG: el camino (m) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across ______  ______; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
55: the stile  ENG: ? (f) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see _____ narrow ________ with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
56c: with steps  ENG: con peldaños (m) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile ______ stone ________; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
57c: a book  ENG: un libro (m) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, ___  _______ and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)
58c: a pencil  ENG: un lápiz (m) SENT: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and _____  ________ in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen) SENTCOMP: How full the hedges are of roses! But I have no time to gather any; I want to be at the house.  I passed a tall briar, shooting leafy and flowery branches across the path; I see the narrow stile with stone steps; and I see- Mr. Rochester sitting there, a book and a pencil in his hand; he is writing. (Pride and Prejudice p. 240, Jane Austen)

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