Mapping and Poverty

I did a quick assessment of minimal food needs for an average person.  There’s a little extra built in.  This is what I came up with as reasonable in the US.

per day (does not include my dependents).

Assume 2100 calories a day for a month.  63 000 calories a month.

3 fruit and 2 vegetables/day

3 cups of milk and 4 oz cheese+ 1 egg

1 cup cereal + 1 cup rice + 1 cup beans+1/2 cup flour

3 tbpsn oil or marg

In terms of calories it comes to:

300+60+306+452+320+240+227+77+118=2100

Financially, where I live now, in one month, it comes to:

6 gallons of milk  $25

2.5 dozen cage-free chicken eggs   $5

5 boxes of cereal $15

80 oz of rice  $3

oil/margarine 2 oz per tablespoon, 6 oz a day, 148 oz/month  3 tubs and 100 oz $19 + $12

120 oz of cheese/month (10 12 oz packs) $25

16 cups of flour $1

100 apples $25

5 lb carrots $4

30 lb potatoes $7

1 head of cabbage $3

greens  $7

8 tomatoes  $9

coffee or tea $5

yeast, pepper, and spices $5

shampoo, soap, and cleaning $5

Using $200 as a New York food stamp allowance, and adjusting according to the grocery cost index as a function of country presented here, I get the following annual grocery expenditures by country with this level of sustainability (that I admit is a “needs met” standard):

Tables

C1 is the grocery index/100 and multiplied by 200 (US food stamp allowance)

C2 is by year

C3 is 3X this, which is an incorrect short cut to other cost of living assessments.  yearly dollar amount estimating groceries to be 33% of need.

C1 C2 C3
Albania 80.46 965.52 2896.56
Algeria 87.52 1050.24 3150.72
Argentina 129.04 1548.48 4645.44
Australia 257.38 3088.56 9265.68
Austria 185.5 2226 6678
Azerbaijan 135.76 1629.12 4887.36
Bahrain 325.82 3909.84 11729.5
Bangladesh 77.02 924.24 2772.72
Belarus 83.78 1005.36 3016.08
Belgium 180.28 2163.36 6490.08
Bolivia 72.84 874.08 2622.24
Bosnia And Herzegovina 94.86 1138.32 3414.96
Brazil 107.94 1295.28 3885.84
Bulgaria 93.78 1125.36 3376.08
Cambodia 128.7 1544.4 4633.2
Canada 202.48 2429.76 7289.28
Chile 116.3 1395.6 4186.8
Greece 149.34 1792.08 5376.24
Hong Kong 159.64 1915.68 5747.04
Hungary 101.74 1220.88 3662.64
Iceland 237.62 2851.44 8554.32
India 65.02 780.24 2340.72
Indonesia 102 1224 3672
Iran 118.56 1422.72 4268.16
Iraq 101.78 1221.36 3664.08
Ireland 211.1 2533.2 7599.6
Israel 153.84 1846.08 5538.24
Italy 174.62 2095.44 6286.32
Japan 225.66 2707.92 8123.76
Jordan 113.56 1362.72 4088.16
Kazakhstan 102.68 1232.16 3696.48
Kenya 121.92 1463.04 4389.12
Kuwait 157.98 1895.76 5687.28
Latvia 110.72 1328.64 3985.92
Lebanon 116.12 1393.44 4180.32
Lithuania 110.72 1328.64 3985.92
Luxembourg 223.56 2682.72 8048.16
Macedonia 76.88 922.56 2767.68
Malaysia 102.92 1235.04 3705.12
Malta 147.36 1768.32 5304.96
Mauritius 86.92 1043.04 3129.12
Mexico 104.96 1259.52 3778.56
Moldova 76.56 918.72 2756.16
Montenegro 112.04 1344.48 4033.44
Morocco 89.42 1073.04 3219.12
Nepal 73.46 881.52 2644.56
Netherlands 162.22 1946.64 5839.92
New Zealand 223.36 2680.32 8040.96
Nigeria 185.86 2230.32 6690.96
Norway 325.06 3900.72 11702.2
Oman 102.74 1232.88 3698.64
Pakistan 64.18 770.16 2310.48
Panama 117.66 1411.92 4235.76
Peru 85.24 1022.88 3068.64
Philippines 102.46 1229.52 3688.56
Poland 93.16 1117.92 3353.76
Portugal 122.5 1470 4410
Puerto Rico 166.9 2002.8 6008.4
Qatar 150 1800 5400
Romania 94.62 1135.44 3406.32
Russia 113.76 1365.12 4095.36
Saudi Arabia 148.94 1787.28 5361.84
Serbia 87.06 1044.72 3134.16
Singapore 182.38 2188.56 6565.68
Slovakia 112.32 1347.84 4043.52
Slovenia 140.98 1691.76 5075.28
South Africa 105.72 1268.64 3805.92
South Korea 188.24 2258.88 6776.64
Spain 133.1 1597.2 4791.6
Sri Lanka 110 1320 3960
Sweden 211.14 2533.68 7601.04
Switzerland 306.1 3673.2 11019.6
Syria 73.4 880.8 2642.4
Taiwan 159.92 1919.04 5757.12
Tanzania 118.4 1420.8 4262.4
Thailand 115.86 1390.32 4170.96
Trinidad And Tobago 111.6 1339.2 4017.6
Tunisia 88.78 1065.36 3196.08
Turkey 100.08 1200.96 3602.88
Ukraine 82.96 995.52 2986.56
United Arab Emirates 129.98 1559.76 4679.28
United Kingdom 186.12 2233.44 6700.32
United States 161.48 1937.76 5813.28
Uruguay 141.06 1692.72 5078.16
Venezuela 252.74 3032.88 9098.64
Vietnam 83.54 1002.48 3007.44

I guess that now, I would like to know what percentage of the population lives below this dollar amount in each country.  There are a couple of different applets out there.  One local one, puts me in the bottom 3% of the US population, at this level.  A more global perspective puts me in the top 30% of the world population at this level.  I found this paper (Sala-i-Martin, 2002 draft), and although I haven’t read it yet, I contemplated the graphs at the end.  Many of the graphs are trimodal.  Is the first peak the dependent peak, the second peak the economic peak, and the third peak the inherited wealth peak?  I think he later collaborates with someone from MIT, and most of the graphs become seemingly more unimodal (still bimodal but only one peak apparent in the distribution).

Doing some math: basically for it to be a map, I think, every x has to have one and only one y, but a y can have more than one x.  To expand things a little, an animal with wings would not map onto an animal without wings, but a 6 legged animal might map onto a 2 legged animal (but not vice-versa).  For example, taking an object, and creating 2 doubles, is explicitly forbidden according to the rules.  We very quickly get into problems of precision and semantics here!

102_2535102_2536102_2537A couple of counter examples here:

102_2541102_2540Struggling with how to formally prove that inverse functions possess exactly the same properties that functions possess.  Is this true?

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